Economy

India’s creative economy battered by Covid: Survey | Kolkata News

Read more at timesofindia.indiatimes.com

Kolkata: India’s rich creative economy developed around sectors like advertising, architecture, arts and culture festivals, crafts, design and fashion, literature and publishing, museums, heritage and public monuments has taken one of the worst hits during the Covid pandemic.
Responses from professionals, artists and artisans to a survey carried out to understand the economic state and sentiment of the creative sector workforce highlights how vulnerable they have become following the lockdown.
The survey was the second to be conducted by British Council, business chamber Ficci and Art X Company since the lockdown.
More than two-third of the respondents said they were uncertain on whether they would be able to survive beyond a year with current resources and funding. Individuals professionals and artisans are facing short-term hand-to-mouth existence though sectors are adapting to digital and live business models to stay afloat.
Nine out of 10 respondents said they feared long-term impact of social distancing in the creative sector, resulting in a decline in audiences and earnings. The contraction is such that respondents felt nearly a sixth of the creative sectors were facing permanent closure to avoid bankruptcy.
Queries for the survey were sent to 4,500 individuals and organisations on the British Council database, and through outreach partners. The link was live from September 1 to October 15, 2020 and 456 responses were received.
In view of the findings and the feedback from creative industry, the report has recommended collaborative emergency action through investments by governments and corporates and strengthening of the creative economy by recognizing the cultural and creative sector as an integral part of the social and economic recovery plan, among other things.
“While the first report helped to understand the immediate impact of Covid-19 on the creative economy; the second report reveals the diminished economic conditions that creative organisations and artists are now faced with,” said British Council director (Arts India) Jonathan Kennedy.

Read more at timesofindia.indiatimes.com

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